Tuesday, 15 April 2008

Posting A Bookshop

Cheltenham has many old buildings and this one has been on the Promenade for 182 years! This grand building was built in 1826 as a home for a painter named Millet. He must have been good to have had this built! The area where I stood to take the photo used to be a fenced garden for the residence, this was the only garden like this on the Prom, right there by the neighbouring shops! After a while Millet moved out and the building became the Imperial Hotel (that's how big it is!), then in 1856 it changed to the Imperial Club, a venue for 'resident noblemen and gentlemen'. But the building is most well known for being Cheltenham's main Post Office from 1874 until 1987. When the Post Office moved out Hooper's department store moved in. More recently the imposing building has been used as a bookshop, firstly Ottakars and now Waterstone's. Inside there is a large open staircase leading to Costa's coffee shop, and when the weather is fine you can take your Latte out onto the Terrace, above the main entrance, and sit looking at the tree tops and the passing shoppers below. And very nice it is too!

8 comments:

brian said...

wow! that building has a lot of history, nice post! it sounds very big as well =)

Dusty Lens said...

182 years?! hard to imagine a building that old. Glad these old buildings fbecome new homes for people to visit.

Chuck Pefley said...

That terrace sounds like the perfect perch for coffee and photography. I love looking down on passersby!

Petrea said...

It sounds lovely, Marley. Re-using a building is the best way to go, and this one sounds especially worthy.

Lori said...

That is an impressive place. I like your description of taking your latte out to relax on the terrace and look at the shoppers. That sounds like fun!

Mo said...

I love the English bookshops. I spend many hours in them.

Rambling Round said...

Your description sure makes me want to visit it. I love the columned entrance.

Neva said...

I'm ready for some coffee!!!

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