Sunday, 15 November 2009

For Whom the Bell Tolls

I can't find out much about this building, in fact I can't find anything! All I do know is its in Gloucester city centre and is the very grand frontage of Baker's watchmaker. I can't even tell you what the characters with the bells mean. So you'll just have to look at the interesting figures and make do!

10 comments:

BlossomFlowerGirl said...

Greetings from Australia.
Very interesting photo there. I notice the word 'baker' is right underneath the angry soul pulling on the bell. I'm not sure I'd trust him with the bread!
Cheers.
Melbourne Daily Photo

Hilda said...

Whatever they're about, I like them! Very charming bell ringers. Have you heard them actually ring the bells?

Bibi said...

These are beautiful! I so love to see this kind of sculpture on buildings; add so much to the experience of buying whatever's sold there!!

Mo said...

I'd love to know what they are all about. I hope one of your visitors can enlighten us

Keropok Man said...

ya, whatever they are, they sure are interesting!

Leeds in Yorkshire daily photo - Paul said...

You may not now anything about these, but have done a little research into buildings in a couple of streets in Leeds from 200 years back I really could have done with a daily photo from back then.
It may not seem like it at times but we in the DP community are creating our own little histories of the cities, towns and communities we explore.
I love these old figures on the practical watchmakers shop.
Paul Leeds daily photo

JM said...

These are super cool!

Jilly said...

How fascinating. Amazing old shopfront sign and figures. The second one looks a bit like John Bull.

Tash said...

This one is really fascinating -
the middle figure is obviously St. Michael but without a dragon to be slain - but ringing the bell and announcing that the time runneth out (hourglass?) - ref to St. Michael ringing a huge bell ‘79: 10-2. The others seem to be dressed in national costumes of UK - Scottsman is obvious, the lady of the far right is Welsh, and as England had no specific costume, maybe the figures on the right are a lady (maybe not quite) and a gentlemen of the early 1800's?

Tash said...

Silly me - the green & yellow is for Northern Ireland, and the man is the English gentleman.

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